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Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities: Big Data Workshop

I spent today at the fascinating AHRC Big Data workshop: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/News-and-Events/Events/Pages/Big-Data-Workshop.aspx If you got lost (like me) @ahrcdigitrans Big Data workshop is under here :-) pic.twitter.com/Cyo124y4tb — Graeme Earl (@GraemeEarl) June 25, 2013 I made notes of what I saw as the headline issues, relating to the forthcoming funding call and what the AHRC considers of interest in the context of Big Data. The workshop was intended to influence the call. Continue reading →

AHRC RTISAD project leads to new research around proto-Elamite

Read a news article on the BBC website about our collaboration with University of Oxford to develop a Reflectance Transformation Imaging system for recording ancient documents. This work was partly funded by an AHRC grant under the DEDEFI scheme. Our role at Southampton has been to develop the capture software and bespoke hardware - described in the article as "part sci-fi, part-DIY, is providing the most detailed and high quality images ever taken of these elusive symbols cut into clay tablets. Continue reading →

DHDL update

The equipment has now been installed for the Digital Humanities Distributed Lab. Two existing lab spaces at Avenue have been revamped. Digital Humanities Lab 1 (65/1085) has 9 imacs setup for time based media creation and editing. There is also a wall mounted screen and an apple TV to allow sharing of content from the imacs and other apple devices. Digital Humanities Lab 2 (65a/3043) is optimised for spatial and graphical digital humanities. Continue reading →

Lecture in Tartu: Digital Archaeologies: Imaging, Fieldwork and Simulation of the Ancient World

I have finished writing my talk for tomorrow at the University of Tartu. The abstract is below. I am going to concentrate on the data capture aspects of the Portus Project and the data visualisation components of our work at Catalhoyuk, with some mention of the RCUK PATINA project and the AHRC RTISAD project. Tomorrow will be my last full day in beautiful Estonia. An amazing place. Continue reading →

#PianoHAWK event

HAWK is a technology that can be utilised to understand more about how the hands move to complete functional tasks. It can accurately measure, to less than a degree, all the dynamic joint information of the human hand. HAWK is a unique set of algorithms that can receive three-dimensional coordinates of a number of fixed points on the wrist, hand fingers and thumb, from, for example, a motion capture system. Continue reading →

Archaeology Seminar: Hearing the Past – The Role of Sound in Digital Heritage Research

Dr Damian Murphy (York Electronics) will be talking in the Archaeological Computing Research Group Lab (Room 3043 B65a) at Avenue Campus on Thursday 3rd May 3-5pm. All welcome. Please RSVP graeme.earl@soton.ac.uk "Hearing the Past - The Role of Sound in Digital Heritage Research" Sound is often considered the poor relation of visual stimuli, yet plays a significant role in conveying information for rapid assimilation by a listener. Continue reading →