Currently browsing tag

archaeology

York Heritage Seminar Series: Description, Dialogue or Debate? Examining the role of narrative in the visualisation of archaeology

Date: 26.02.2013 Time: 5.30pm Speaker: John Swogger (Archaeological illustrator) Location: Room 3043 building 65a (avenue campus) Tuesday 26 February we will be live-streaming another York Heritage Seminar, this time by the archaeological illustrator John Swogger who will talk about “Description, Dialogue or Debate? Examining the role of narrative in the visualisation of archaeology”. Continue reading →

Art and Archaeology at Southampton and Winchester

Postgraduate students and staff from the Archaeological Computing Research group are currently working with staff and students from Winchester School of Art on a new collaborative venture which will see the two departments sharing expertise, facilities and most importantly ideas. Led by Gareth Beale and Nicole Beale from Archaeology and Ian Dawson and Louisa Minkin from WSA the project aims to get students from both campuses to think differently about how they do research. Continue reading →

Seeing in a New Light – Archaeological Computing Research Group Seminar

This Friday is the first ACRG seminar of the term, and we welcome all students and staff to attend. Seeing in a new light: How can polynomial texture mapping help record forensic investigations of cremations? Polynomial texture mapping is an image capture and processing technique used to record and represent details from a surface. It has been utilised in archaeology, cultural heritage projects, and forensics. Continue reading →

Seeing in a New Light – Archaeological Computing Research Group Seminar

Speaker: Sally Ford Location: Digital Archaeology Lab, Building 65a, Avenue Campus, Southampton Date: 26.10.2012, 2-3pm This Friday is the first ACRG seminar of the term, and we welcome all students and staff to attend. Seeing in a new light: How can polynomial texture mapping help record forensic investigations of cremations? Polynomial texture mapping is an image capture and processing technique used to record and represent details from a surface. Continue reading →

sotonDH small grant: Introducing ‘A Connected Island?’: how the Iron Curtain affected Archaeologists

After the Second World War the Iron Curtain sliced through the very centre of Europe forming a very real divide in both political and daily lives. In the second half of the 20th century the Soviet regime introduced a new structure to the academic institutions to countries like Poland, Hungary and former Czechoslovakia, including restrictions on contacts with the Western world and ideological pressure previously unknown in these parts of Europe. Continue reading →

Connected Past videos online now

Two months ago members of SotonDH organised a conference about networks in archaeology and history, called The Connected Past. The event was great (or at least that is how we experienced it). But if you were not able to be there you will be happy to know that the recorded talks are now available online. The recorded talks are illustrative of the wide range of topics by scholars from an equally diverse range of disciplines. Continue reading →

Thinking beyond the tool

At last year's Theoretical Archaeology Group a session titled 'Thinking beyond the tool' was held, chaired by the university's Costas Papadopoulos, Angeliki Chrysanthi and Patricia Murrieta Flores. The sessions aimed to move beyond simple archaeological applications of computational techniques and reflect on the theoretical implications involved. The themes covered included augmented reality, 3D reconstructions, photo-realism, social network analysis and databases. Continue reading →

An overview of The Connected Past

Over the weekend of 24-25 March 2012 a group of 150 archaeologists, historians, mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists and others from 19 different countries met at The University of Southampton. Their objective: to discuss the critical application of network and complexity perspectives to archaeology and history. Continue reading →

Re-Reading the British Memorial: A Community Documentation Project

The Re-reading the British Memorial project is investigating the potential for using a variety of technologies for the recording, interpreting and sharing of data about church memorials in the UK. the project is based within the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton, UK. The purpose of the project is to provide expert assistance and training to local groups wishing to document, interpret and disseminate cultural heritage using digital imaging technologies. Continue reading →