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Making Digital: Visual Approaches to the Digital Humanities

Over the past few months Gareth and I have been lucky enough to be involved in a project working with artists from Winchester School of Art to develop a series of training events looking at the relationship between art and archaeology.  This project has been a fantastic experience. Later this week, we are all going to EVA London 2013 to talk about the project, and we wanted to share with you the paper we've collaboratively written. Continue reading →

Gender and Digital Culture

The Gender and Digital Culture Project is currently running its inaugural survey, and we need your help to enable us to understand how gender informs the ways people use digital communication in their professional lives. You can go to the survey right away by clicking here, or continue reading to find out more about the project itself. Continue reading →

sotonDH Small Grants: Introducing ‘Mapping Libel Performance in Early Modern Devon’

Accounts of early modern libel survive in the Star Chamber records, from which I have transcribed the Devon cases; these libels, I argue, should be seen as public performances and analysed in light of this. Having received a SotonDH grant, work has begun on a digital mapping resource which aims to present instances of performance-based libel from the county of Devon alongside key features of the contemporary landscape in order to demonstrate their performance nature. Continue reading →

Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities: Big Data Workshop

I spent today at the fascinating AHRC Big Data workshop: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/News-and-Events/Events/Pages/Big-Data-Workshop.aspx If you got lost (like me) @ahrcdigitrans Big Data workshop is under here :-) pic.twitter.com/Cyo124y4tb — Graeme Earl (@GraemeEarl) June 25, 2013 I made notes of what I saw as the headline issues, relating to the forthcoming funding call and what the AHRC considers of interest in the context of Big Data. The workshop was intended to influence the call. Continue reading →

Wikipedia for Smaller Museums

Today, the Museums Association published the new issue of Museum Practice. This month the magazine focuses on Wikipedia, and I contributed an article providing practical advice for smaller museums. The journal is behind a paywall, but the Museums Association have kindly agreed to let me share a draft of the article here at the Digital Humanities blog. Continue reading →

Ways of Seeing the English Domestic Interior, 1500-1700: the case of decorative textiles

On 19th March I attended the third workshop for this AHRC research network. The aim of the day was to explore how eyetracking technology can be exploited towards the understanding of visitor experience of 17th century painted cloths at Owlpen Manor in Gloucestershire. The day began with two groups of volunteers being “wired up” to the eyetracking hardware. Continue reading →