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Seeing in a New Light – Archaeological Computing Research Group Seminar

Speaker: Sally Ford Location: Digital Archaeology Lab, Building 65a, Avenue Campus, Southampton Date: 26.10.2012, 2-3pm This Friday is the first ACRG seminar of the term, and we welcome all students and staff to attend. Seeing in a new light: How can polynomial texture mapping help record forensic investigations of cremations? Polynomial texture mapping is an image capture and processing technique used to record and represent details from a surface. Continue reading →

AHRC RTISAD project leads to new research around proto-Elamite

Read a news article on the BBC website about our collaboration with University of Oxford to develop a Reflectance Transformation Imaging system for recording ancient documents. This work was partly funded by an AHRC grant under the DEDEFI scheme. Our role at Southampton has been to develop the capture software and bespoke hardware - described in the article as "part sci-fi, part-DIY, is providing the most detailed and high quality images ever taken of these elusive symbols cut into clay tablets. Continue reading →

sotonDH small grant: Scanning Winchester Cathedral (part two)

Having received a small sotonDH student research grant I took the ScanStation 2 laser scanner owned by the Geography department to Winchester cathedral. Scanning started with the Pilgrims’ hall located next the Pilgrims’ school (attached) with both the interior and exterior being scanned at a 2cm resolution. The resolution was chosen through a combination of trying to gain enough data that can be used to create a reasonable representation of the building with the time available. Continue reading →

18th century letters from Jamaica posted online give new insights into slavery

Historian and Senior Lecturer Dr Christer Petley has used digital technology to create an online teaching and research resource about slavery in the British Caribbean in the 18th century. Slavery and Revolution showcases the letters of a wealthy and powerful landowner in Jamaica. The website uses a blogging format to explore the world of Simon Taylor (1738-1813), a slaveholder and plantation owner who lived on the island during a period characterised by revolution, war, and imperial reform. Continue reading →

sotonDH small grant: Scanning Winchester Cathedral

I recently gained some funding in the form of a small sotonDH student research grant that was used within the data collection of my PhD. The focus of the application was on the use of a terrestrial laser scanner to create an accurate recording of Winchester cathedral and its surrounding buildings. The cathedral was original consecrated in 1093 and since its formation has undergone a number of different changes in terms of size, architecture and use. Continue reading →

DHDL update

The equipment has now been installed for the Digital Humanities Distributed Lab. Two existing lab spaces at Avenue have been revamped. Digital Humanities Lab 1 (65/1085) has 9 imacs setup for time based media creation and editing. There is also a wall mounted screen and an apple TV to allow sharing of content from the imacs and other apple devices. Digital Humanities Lab 2 (65a/3043) is optimised for spatial and graphical digital humanities. Continue reading →

sotonDH small grant: Introducing ‘A Connected Island?’: how the Iron Curtain affected Archaeologists

After the Second World War the Iron Curtain sliced through the very centre of Europe forming a very real divide in both political and daily lives. In the second half of the 20th century the Soviet regime introduced a new structure to the academic institutions to countries like Poland, Hungary and former Czechoslovakia, including restrictions on contacts with the Western world and ideological pressure previously unknown in these parts of Europe. Continue reading →

sotonDH small grants: Painting the landscape itself. No, I mean really, actually painting it. Oh, and in sound.

If ever you decide to demonstrate your crazy, arcane research, the ideas you dream about and discuss with yourself, sometimes inadvertently aloud - then find you’ve accidentally instigated the biggest, most exciting and terrifying project of your life, don’t call me to complain. I will only laugh. I was working on how to motion-track listeners so they can walk inside a piece of music - we’re getting there, with amazing work from composer-programmer Iyad Assaf, it’s called 3D-BARE. Continue reading →