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Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities: Big Data Workshop

I spent today at the fascinating AHRC Big Data workshop: If you got lost (like me) @ahrcdigitrans Big Data workshop is under here :-) — Graeme Earl (@GraemeEarl) June 25, 2013 I made notes of what I saw as the headline issues, relating to the forthcoming funding call and what the AHRC considers of interest in the context of Big Data. The workshop was intended to influence the call. Continue reading →

AHRC RTISAD project leads to new research around proto-Elamite

Read a news article on the BBC website about our collaboration with University of Oxford to develop a Reflectance Transformation Imaging system for recording ancient documents. This work was partly funded by an AHRC grant under the DEDEFI scheme. Our role at Southampton has been to develop the capture software and bespoke hardware - described in the article as "part sci-fi, part-DIY, is providing the most detailed and high quality images ever taken of these elusive symbols cut into clay tablets. Continue reading →

Verily, forsooth – Shakespeare enters the digital world, stage left

If you liked the Hollywood movie Shakespeare in Love, you might want to find out more about theatres and society in London in those days. A colleague at the University of Southampton is behind an exciting online project that makes a wealth of documentary evidence freely available for the first time, thanks to an international research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Continue reading →

Ancient and modern. Digital ways of learning about a medieval town

I met an enthusiast for using digital technology to bring medieval literature and culture to wider audiences, who has joined us in Humanities at Southampton. Professor of English Catherine Clarke is helping local people and visitors understand more aboutChesterin medieval times – through digital mapping tools and new media. “The town has always celebrated its Roman history, and now we’re helping to explore its rich medieval heritage,” she says. Continue reading →