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augmented reality

Thinking beyond the tool

At last year's Theoretical Archaeology Group a session titled 'Thinking beyond the tool' was held, chaired by the university's Costas Papadopoulos, Angeliki Chrysanthi and Patricia Murrieta Flores. The sessions aimed to move beyond simple archaeological applications of computational techniques and reflect on the theoretical implications involved. The themes covered included augmented reality, 3D reconstructions, photo-realism, social network analysis and databases. Continue reading →

Workshop on 3D Heritage on the mobile web – Part Three

'Mobile Heritage applications: the case of the Gorafe Dolmens' by Jon Arambarri, VirtualWare and Jaime Kaminski, University of Brighton Jon gave a short presentation on the VirtualWare services on virtual and augmented reality applications. (for more information go to This presentation considered how a mobile app has been used to augment a wider strategy of providing visitor information about the archaeological landscape in the region of Gorafe, Spain. Continue reading →

Workshop on 3D Heritage on the mobile web – Part Two

'Use and discoverability of 3d in the context of Europeana' by Jan Molendijk, Europeana Foundation Jan talked about Europeana, the discoverability service for Europe’s digital heritage objects ( and the links with 3D-COFORM. Also, he pointed out that ‘The New Renaissance’ report (2011) recommends ‘the reinforcement of Europeana as the reference point for European culture on-line. Continue reading →

Workshop on 3D Heritage on the mobile web – Part One

The workshop took place on the 7th of February at the University of Brighton and was organised as part of the 3D services on the Mobile Web project by members of the 3D-COFORM. This research project is funded by the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) and aims ‘to establish 3D documentation as an affordable, practical and effective mechanism for long term documentation of tangible cultural heritage’. Continue reading →