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network analysis, Page 2

Roman Port Networks in the Roman Mediterranean

The Roman Port Networks Project is a collaboration between 30 European partners, examining the connections between Roman ports across the Mediterranean.¬†The project uses analyses of the co-presence of ceramics and marble to explore changing connections between Portus, Rome and selected ports in the Mediterranean at defined chronological periods throughout the imperial period. Continue reading →

The Connected Past: people, networks and complexity in archaeology and history

A two-day collaborative, multi-disciplinary symposium The University of Southampton 24-25 March 2012   Sponsored by¬†Archaeopress,¬†The Classical Association, the¬†Archaeological Computing Research Group,¬†Oxford University Press, the¬†University of Southampton USRG Complexity in Real-world Contexts, the¬†University of Southampton Web Science DTC¬†and the¬†University of Southampton Faculty of Humanities     Conference objectives: To provide a forum for the presentation... Continue reading →

The Connected Past: people, networks and complexity in archaeology and history

A two-day collaborative, multi-disciplinary symposium at¬†the University of Southampton 24-25 March 2012 Sponsored by¬†Archaeopress,¬†The Classical Association, the¬†Archaeological Computing Research Group,¬†Oxford University Press, the¬†University of Southampton USRG Complexity in Real-world Contexts, the¬†University of Southampton Web Science DTC¬†and the¬†University of Southampton Faculty of Humanities Conference objectives: To provide a forum for the presentation and debate of... Continue reading →

'A Small Greek World' by |rad Malkin

Irad Malkin's new book 'A small Greek world: networks in the Ancient Mediterranean' has just appeared with Oxford University Press. Looks like a fascinating read, seeing Ancient Greek history through network goggles. Visit the publisher‚Äôs webpage to order. Irad Malkin will visit Southampton in March for The Connected Past symposium. Here is the book's summary: Greek civilization and identity crystallized not when Greeks were close together but when they came to be far apart. Continue reading →